30 Times People Traveled To Japan And Realized Theyre Too Tall For It

On the other side is Japan; 126 million people squeezed on to four main islands, with a total area 26 times smaller than the USA. The Japanese have learned to be economical with space – whether it be technology, houses or dioramas – which can be an issue when tall people visit the country. Heads are bumped on low doors, showers are too short, and train seats… well, it’s cozy put it that way. #2 Tall In Japan #3 6’3” Lived In A Traditional Japanese House In Japan For Two Months. There Were Lots Of Exposed Wooden Beams Things don’t fit: Many things won’t fit you. At my size, it is not that hard to find fitting clothes or shoes. …

Everyone Needs a Good PillowEven Astronauts Bound for Mars

By all accounts sleeping in space is a dream. After a long day of running experiments and rigorous exercise, astronauts on the International Space Station retire to their padded sleep pods, which have just enough room to fit the astronaut, a laptop mounted to a wall, and a few practical items. To prevent themselves from drifting through the station while catching some zero-g z’s, astronauts snuggle into a sleeping bag mounted to the wall of their sleep pod. As they start to slumber, their bodies relax and their arms drift out in front of them, making them look like floating zombies. Absent from astronauts’ bedrooms, though, are pillows. In microgravity you don’t need one—you don’t even need to hold your …

A Bizarre Form of Water May Exist All Over the Universe

Recently at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics in Brighton, New York, one of the world’s most powerful lasers blasted a droplet of water, creating a shock wave that raised the water’s pressure to millions of atmospheres and its temperature to thousands of degrees. X-rays that beamed through the droplet in the same fraction of a second offered humanity’s first glimpse of water under those extreme conditions. The X-rays revealed that the water inside the shock wave didn’t become a superheated liquid or gas. Paradoxically—but just as physicists squinting at screens in an adjacent room had expected—the atoms froze solid, forming crystalline ice. “You hear the shot,” said Marius Millot of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, and “right away you …