NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine explains how startups can help with Artemis Moon missions

At this week’s International Astronautical Congress, where the space industry, international space agencies and researchers from around the world convene to discuss the state of space technology and business, I asked NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine about what role he sees for startups in contributing to his agency’s ambitious Artemis program. Artemis (named after Apollo’s twin sister, one of the gods of Greek mythology) is NASA’s mission to return human beings to the surface of the Moon — this time to stay — and to use that as a staging ground for further exploration to Mars and beyond. Bridenstine, fielding the question during a press Q+A about Artemis, said the program is incredibly welcoming of contributions from startups large and small, …

Relativity, a new star in the space race, raises $140 million for its 3-D printed rockets

Relativity Space Elon Musk says Starship should reach orbit within six months – and could even fly with a crew next year For now, Relativity remains focused on the clear, near-term business opportunity of getting more satellites into the Earth’s orbit for telecommunications companies. The financiers funding the company’s plans are a mix of Silicon Valley venture capital firms and members of Hollywood’s elite, which is only fitting for a company whose headquarters are in Los Angeles, but whose business takes it to the far flung research centers and launch facilities which support the U.S. space industry. From Hollywood, Relativity has managed to coax cash from the founder of the Creative Artists Agency, Michael Ovitz, and the Academy Award-winning actor …