The Last Black Man in San Francisco review moving tale of racial gentrification

A quirky approach gives Joe Talbots fact-based drama the feel of a fable You dont get to hate it unless you love it, says third-generation San Franciscan Jimmie (Jimmie Fails). Hes on a bus, quietly incensed as a pair of yuppies (one played by Thora Birch) declare that the city is over. This Sundance award-winning film, written and directed by Joe Talbot and based on his friend Failss Original Article : HERE ; The Ultimate Survival Food: The Lost Ways

Pillow Talk to Bonnie and Clyde: the greatest Wayne Fitzgerald main titles

The esteemed designer, who died this week, left behind a career of work on some of Hollywoods biggest and most-loved films This Monday marked the death of main title designer Wayne Fitzgerald at the age of 89. One of the great movie and television craftsmen of the past half century, if you dont recognize Fitzgerald by name, youre probably still familiar with his body of work, which included a filmography boasting more than 450 credits and which earned him three Emmys over the course of his career. Alongside the likes of Saul and Elaine Bass, Dan Peri and Pablo Ferro, Fitzgerald turned the craft of title design so often taken for granted into an art form unto itself. The full …

Downton Abbey, like plantation houses, delivers fantasy over brute reality | Michael Henry Adams

The American south may seem a long way from the estates of England, but in both places a veil of caprice covers harsh truths The son of a Scottish immigrant who worked as a servant, Donald Trump could hardly wait for his banquet at Buckingham Palace. A seat next to Elizabeth II conferred a sense of accomplishment little else could. To many, such behavior from an American president Gone With the Wind, I saw plantation houses for which I thought I could sell my soul. It seemed such an alluring way of life. No wonder people visit Savannah or Charleston. They, like me, have imagined themselves in the masters place. No work to be done, fanned on white-pillared porches, sipping …

My daughter was raised during the siege of Aleppo. I had to make a film for her

For Sama, a new documentary from award winning Syrian journalist Waad al-Kateab has won global acclaim The camera focuses on Samas face. She is the sweetest baby and looks, at first glance, as though her life might be ordinary. Her eyes are a transitory newborn colour, greyish green, waiting to turn brown. Her gold earrings look over-large in her tiny ears. Sama means sky in Arabic a sky, as her mother imagines it, where no bombs fall, with ordinary clouds and sunshine. So far, this is footage that could be the work of any doting parent, but Samas mother is journalist Waad al-Kateab and this is her documentary For Sama, filmed during the Syrian war. In the film al-Kateab sings …

Goodbye to Gomorrah: the end of Italy’s most notorious housing estate

Famous as the setting for the hit Italian film and TV series Gomorrah, the towers of Le Vele became synonymous with poverty and organised crime until residents took charge When I think of my life in Le Vele, my skin crawls with rage, says Omero Benfenati. He looks out from a dark, narrow passageway framed by suspended steel stairways that block the natural light and lead up to abandoned apartments. Most of the windows are bricked up, and liquid leaks from split pipes on to the sewage and refuse-strewn asphalt several storeys below. We used to play down there, says Benfenati, now a housing activist. The uncollected rubbish bags make ideal goalposts for five-a-side football. Just a few years ago, …

Sterile or stirring? Britain’s love-hate relationship with new towns

Paternalistic social engineering or make-Britain-great-again utopianism? A new archive film compilation takes a look at the UKs controversial postwar towns People sometimes say to me, You must get a terrific kick out of having been responsible for a huge thing like a new town, said Sir Frederick Gibberd in an interview in 1982, 35 years after he created the new town of Harlow. Well, I get a lot of misery out of it, in fact. I go around and think, My god, thats unbelievably bad, and it could have been so good. If that was what the designer thought, imagine how everyone else who moved to Harlow felt. The interview comes in a short film at the end of Stevenage, …