Dasha AI is calling so you dont have to

While you’d be hard-pressed to find any startup not brimming with confidence over the disruptive idea they’re chasing, it’s not often you come across a young company as calmly convinced it’s engineering the future as Dasha AI. The team is building a platform for designing human-like voice interactions to automate business processes. Put simply, it’s using AI to make machine voices a whole lot less robotic. “What we definitely know is this will definitely happen,” says CEO and co-founder Vladislav Chernyshov. “Sooner or later the conversational AI/voice AI will replace people everywhere where the technology will allow. And it’s better for us to be the first mover than the last in this field.” “In 2018 in the U.S. alone there …

A Boeing Code Leak Exposes Security Flaws Deep in a 787’s Guts

Late one night last September, security researcher Ruben Santamarta sat in his home office in Madrid and partook in some creative googling, searching for technical documents related to his years-long obsession: the cybersecurity of airplanes. He was surprised to discover a fully unprotected server on Boeing's network, seemingly full of code designed to run on the company's giant 737 and 787 passenger jets, left publicly accessible and open to anyone who found it. So he downloaded everything he could see. Now, nearly a year later, Santamarta claims that leaked code has led him to something unprecedented: security flaws in one of the 787 Dreamliner's components, deep in the plane's multi-tiered network. He suggests that for a hacker, exploiting those bugs …

Intel’s New 10-Nanometer Chips Have Finally Arrived

Today we learned everything there is to know about the new Intel chip that will likely power the next laptop you buy. For months, the chipmaker has been hyping the launch of its 10th-generation, 10-nanometer silicon processor, codenamed Ice Lake. We heard a little about it at CES in Las Vegas in January and at Computex in Taipei, Taiwan, in May. Now Ice Lake chips are officially available for PC makers to use, so Intel is finally sharing all the critical details. The company has also been teasing Project Athena, a new set of laptop specifications and performance expectations that Intel says it will co-engineer with PC makers. The Athena program is, in many ways, not unlike the Ultrabook specifications …

New missile defense tech destroys incoming nukes faster

If a Space-Based Infrared satellite detected a launch, it would quickly send sensitive data signals to an Air Force command center where the information would be evaluated by computers. Then, the command center would send a wide-sweeping “alert through the ballistic missile defense system,” a senior Pentagon official told Warrior. “When a satellite recognizes something that looks like a launch, it has a mathematical formula in a computer that tracks the heat source,” the official said. “Then we start turning on radar”… he added. Response decisions, which could involve the immediate deployment of a well-armed and ready U.S. nuclear triad…. hinge almost entirely upon .. time. In effect, the faster tracking, targeting and countermeasure analysis can take place, the greater …

Depth of Field: The Otherworldliness of the Democratic Presidential Debates

Reality TV is meant to trick the eyes. The high drama of housewives bickering about who said what over a bottle of wine. Cast members secretly scheming to avoid elimination off the island. Contestants blatantly lying to rig the game in their favor. What unfolds before us, to quote Susan Murray and Laura Ouelette in 2008's Reality TV: Remaking Television Culture, "is an unstable text that encourages viewers to test out their own notions of the real, the ordinary, and the intimate against the representation before them." This week, inside Detroit's Fox Theatre, Democratic presidential hopefuls participated in the second round of debates. Last night found two of the top candidates—Senator Kamala Harris and Vice President Joe Biden, along with …

A Tale of Two Jeffreys: How the Virgin Islands Welcomed a Rich Sex Offenderand Punished a Poor One

From the Virgin Islands comes a tale of two Jeffreys, and the difference great wealth can make when it comes to sex crimesuntil it doesn't. Both Jeffreys were convicted of shameful crimes that required them to register as sex offenders in whatever state or jurisdiction they resided. plea deal only a super-rich guy could have swung. He did 18 months locked up, mostly in a private wing of the Palm Beach County jail, where he only stayed at night, returning each morning to who appeared to be barely in their teens. He would announce his periodic return by raising the American flag over the opulent hideaway identified on the maps as Little Saint James Island, but the headline in a …

Children From The US And Mexico Play Together On These Seesaws Built On The Border Wall In Defiance Of Trump

Like something out of a fairytale, a set of shocking pink seesaws sprang up right in the middle of the United States border wall with Mexico. Quite unsurprisingly, the seesaws became an instant hit. Children (and adults!) flocked to have fun on them, not minding the metal border wall that separated them. Image credits: The seesaws were installed right across the US-Mexico border between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez in Mexico. The geniuses behind this brilliant and playful idea were two professors. They are Ronald Rael, a professor of architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, and Virginia San Fratello — an associate professor of design at San José State University posted videos and photos of the seesaws in …

45 Funny And Strange Things Spotted On the Subway (New Pics)

Ah, the subway! The magical place where the laws of normality stop working. The moment you go underground to catch a train, you’d best be prepared to see hilarious, weird and, frankly, mind-blowing things. To keep you laughing all day long and to remind you that life is full of little surprises, Bored Panda compiled this list of funny, bizarre and peculiar things spotted on the subway. Vote for your favorite strange(r) things (pun most definitely intended), and let us know in the comments below what you think the stories behind the pictures are. Also, be sure to check out Bored Panda’s other lists about the subway, including weird people, the most beautiful metro stations, vintage photos of New York’s …

Using AI and Film to Track Tear Gas Use Against Civilians

Filmmaker Laura Poitras’ Oscar-winning documentary Citizenfour centers on the pale, calm face of National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden holed up in a plain Hong Kong hotel room. Her latest star is even more impassive—an aluminum tear gas grenade—but it's seen amid surreal pulsating color. The 10-minute short, Triple Chaser, is named for that tear gas canister, a branded product of Florida’s Safariland Group that human rights groups say has been used by US border agents against migrants in Tijuana and by Israeli forces in Palestine. The film, a collaboration with the nonprofit Forensic Architecture, documents how that organization is devel­oping machine-learning software that could help uncover where Triple Chaser canisters are being launched or thrown. It also accuses prominent …

Artists installed seesaws at the border so kids in the US and Mexico could play together

(CNN)It may seem like an ordinary scene: Children and adults playing on pink seesaws, carelessly laughing and chatting with each other View this post on Instagram Ten years later, their conceptual drawings became reality. Rael and his crew transported the seesaws to Sunland Park, New Mexico, separated by a steel fence from Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. People from both sides came together Monday to play in a “unifying act,” the University of California said in a statement. Participants on the Mexico side had no planning, it said. In an Instagram post, Rael said the event was “filled with joy, excitement, and togetherness at the borderwall.” “The wall became a literal fulcrum for U.S -Mexico relations and children and adults were connected …

Seesaws Built Across The U.S.-Mexico Border To Let Children Play Together

Ronald Rael, an architecture professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and Virginia San Fratello, an associate professor of design at San Jose State, unveiled the three pink teeter-totters on Monday in an Instagram post. The installation was built in a slatted border fence that separates Sunland Park, New Mexico, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, “The wall became a literal fulcrum for U.S.-Mexico relations and children and adults were connected in meaningful ways on both sides with the recognition that the actions that take place on one side have a direct consequence on the other side,” Rael wrote in an Instagram post Monday. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Ronald Rael (@rrael) on Jul 28, 2019 at 11:22pm PDT …

Its a superpower: how walking makes us healthier, happier and brainier

Neuroscientist Shane OMara believes that plenty of regular walking unlocks the cognitive powers of the brain like nothing else. He explains why you should exchange your gym kit for a pair of comfy shoes and get strolling Taking a stroll with Shane OMara is a risky endeavour. The neuroscientist is so passionate about walking, and our collective right to go for walks, that he is determined not to let the slightest unfortunate aspect of urban design break his stride. So much so, that he has a habit of darting across busy roads as the lights change. One of lifes great horrors as youre walking is waiting for permission to cross the street, he tells me, when we are forced to …

If You Care About Cities, Apple’s New Campus Sucks

The new headquarters Apple is building in Cupertino has the absolute best door handles. The greatest! They are, as my colleague Steven Levy writes, precision-milled aluminum rails that attach to glass doors—sliding and swinging alike—with no visible bolts. Everything in this building is the best. The toroid glass of the roof curves scientifically to shed rainwater. And if it never rains again (this being California), well, an arborist selected thousands of drought-tolerant new trees for the 175-acre site. Not every Apple employee will get to work in the new building—ouch!—but 12,000 will. Of course, it only has 9,000 parking spaces, but that’s supposed to encourage people to take an Apple shuttle to work. And once they arrive, they’re not going …

Theme parks, pubs and ‘human zoos’: how the Victorians invented leisure

Entrepreneurs came up with increasingly elaborate ways to part Londoners from their money, inventing many staples of the modern leisure industry Whether it was visiting a human zoo, taking a bull on a hot-air balloon ride, or singing risqu songs about rhubarb, Victorian Londoners loved to have fun. As entrepreneurs and impresarios came up with increasingly elaborate ways to make money from the capitals huge potential audience, Victorians effectively invented the modern leisure industry including theme parks, pubs and professional football. As a new book by historian Lee Jackson explains, the hunt for profit took place against the backdrop of typical Victorian concerns surrounding morality, class and empire. So where did Victorians go for fun? And what still exists today? …

‘Doctors knew my son had HIV, but didn’t tell him’

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption‘I feel guilt that we allowed it to happen’ Paul Summers was five when he was diagnosed with the blood disorder haemophilia in 1969. His parents Pat and Tony were shocked, but also relieved. They had spent their son’s early years ferrying him from their home in Llantwit Major to Bridgend hospital with unexplained bruises and bleeding problems. A knock or cut could see the active little boy in hospital for weeks. When a revolutionary new treatment called Factor VIII was proposed by doctors in the late 1970s, a teenage Paul was thrilled he could inject himself at home, freed of regular trips to the haemophiliac unit at Cardiff’s Royal Infirmary for …

Artist Crochets New Life Into Fallen Leaves

Susanna Bauer (featured previously) works with found natural objects like leaves, wood and stone; incorporating them with crochet in unique and unconventional ways. Born in Germany, the artist studied landscape architecture at Munich’s Technische Universität and art at London’s Camberwell College of Art. She currently calls Cornwall, UK, home. On her website she explains: “I just work very carefully with very small hooks and needles… It took me a very long time to get to know the limits of the materials I work with. When I start a piece of work I have a fairly clear idea what a particular leaf or piece of wood will allow me to do, so thankfully breakages are very rare these days.” Scott Rothstein …