Last chance for early-bird tickets to TC Sessions: Enterprise 2019

It’s down to the wire folks. Today’s the last day you can save $100 on your ticket to TC Sessions: Enterprise 2019, which takes place on September 5 at the Yerba Buena Center in San Francisco. The deadline expires in mere hours — at 11:59 p.m. (PT). Get the best possible price and buy your early-bird ticket right now. We expect more than 1,000 attendees representing the enterprise software community’s best and brightest. We’re talking founders of companies in every stage and CIOs and systems architects from some of the biggest multinationals. And, of course, managing partners from the most influential venture and corporate investment firms. Take a look at just some of the companies joining us for

‘Troubles tourism’: should Derry be celebrating its political murals?

Fifty years since the Battle of the Bogside, some fear the new status of Derrys murals as a tourist attraction will stop the community overcoming the past One of the first things you see as you enter Bogside is a 20ft mural of a 12-year-old boy, wearing a gas mask and clutching a petrol bomb. Painted on the side of a social housing property, its a stark reminder of the violence that tore Derry apart during NI Tourism report puts political murals as the eighth most visited attraction in the entire country. The neighbouring Museum of Free Derry, which tells the story of Bloody Sunday, attracted 35,000 visitors in 2018. According to the tourist board, all coach tours to the …

Global trade disruption is a symptom of a deeper malaise | Mohamed El-Erian

Resolving US-China trade war is not enough to ward off what many fear is a looming worldwide recession It is only a matter of time until the escalating tensions between China and the US prompt many more economists to warn of an impending global economic recession coupled with financial instability. On 5 August, Bloomberg News Larry Summers, a former US treasury secretary who was also closely involved in crisis-management efforts in 2008-09, recently The Only Game in Town, all of these recent developments and also, of course, the growing US-China tensions are related in a meaningful way to two basic and persistent features of the global economy since the 2008 financial crisis. The first is the prolonged period in which …

In seeking to control Kashmir, Modi may look to China’s actions in Xinjiang and Tibet

Hong Kong (CNN)The gleaming white bullet train whips through the Chinese countryside, past endless construction sites and new towns. Kashmir and Xinjiang share many similarities. Both have long been regions of disputed sovereignty, where a predominantly Muslim minority has pushed against control by a non-Muslim state, and both are now facing increased pressure in countries once committed to multiethnic pluralities that have taken a turn for majoritarian assimilation. Uyghur Muslims in Xinjiang have been minoritized in many cities and faced increased competition for jobs from Han migrants. At the same time, they have been subjected to draconian surveillance and policing, with up to 2 million people detained in what critics call “re-education camps,” according to expert estimates. Uyghur activists have …

Modern football kits are stretching credibility they’re not worth the ballyhoo | Simon Burnton

Gone are the days when it was enough for a new strip to look good. Designers are obsessed with spinning a complex yarn In 1976 the groundbreaking choreographer Peter Darrell debuted Mary Queen of Scots, an attempt to tell the story of the doomed monarch entirely through the medium of dance. Darrells ballet is historically pretty accurate, James Kennedy wrote in his review for the Guardian. The events, as here transmuted into classical dance, did (more or less) happen. Why did Darrell and his lively company do it? Well, you can have marvellous historical plays and poignant, if imperfect, historical operas, so why not a successful historical ballet? Forty-three years have now passed since Darrells ballet opened to the public, …

Why have Americans given so much money to restore Notre-Dame?

When the iconic cathedral was nearly lost to flames, the wave of grief was felt across the Atlantic as donations came rolling in As news broke on 15 April 2019 that the roof of the French cathedral Notre-Dame de Paris was on fire, phones immediately started ringing at the offices of the French Heritage Society, executive director Jennifer Herlein recalls. People, most of them Americans, some in tears, were offering donations to rebuild the beloved gothic monument. We cannot imagine a world without Paris, and we cannot imagine a Paris without Notre-Dame, the French Heritage Society had said in its call for funds. It was right. The French Heritage Society has so far received $2.45m in donations, mostly from the …

A world of walls: the brutish power of man-made barriers

Trumps border wall isnt unique. From Calais to Hungary, walls are always with us The latest atrocity in El Paso, when an avowed white supremacist drove for 10 hours to a supermarket used by Latino families in order to murder and maim, was explicitly motivated by Trumps baleful, anti-immigrant rhetoric. He was also a big fan of Trumps wall, which Trump himself has rhapsodically described as an impenetrable, physical, tall, powerful, beautiful southern border wall. Yet despite its Ozymandian ambition, the beautiful wall has stuttered and stumbled, still more frenzied rallying cry than bricks and mortar reality. Geography and logistics quietly conspire against it Americas border with Mexico is nearly 2,000 miles long, for a start. Incendiary talk of spiralling …

Dasha AI is calling so you dont have to

While you’d be hard-pressed to find any startup not brimming with confidence over the disruptive idea they’re chasing, it’s not often you come across a young company as calmly convinced it’s engineering the future as Dasha AI. The team is building a platform for designing human-like voice interactions to automate business processes. Put simply, it’s using AI to make machine voices a whole lot less robotic. “What we definitely know is this will definitely happen,” says CEO and co-founder Vladislav Chernyshov. “Sooner or later the conversational AI/voice AI will replace people everywhere where the technology will allow. And it’s better for us to be the first mover than the last in this field.” “In 2018 in the U.S. alone there …

A Boeing Code Leak Exposes Security Flaws Deep in a 787’s Guts

Late one night last September, security researcher Ruben Santamarta sat in his home office in Madrid and partook in some creative googling, searching for technical documents related to his years-long obsession: the cybersecurity of airplanes. He was surprised to discover a fully unprotected server on Boeing's network, seemingly full of code designed to run on the company's giant 737 and 787 passenger jets, left publicly accessible and open to anyone who found it. So he downloaded everything he could see. Now, nearly a year later, Santamarta claims that leaked code has led him to something unprecedented: security flaws in one of the 787 Dreamliner's components, deep in the plane's multi-tiered network. He suggests that for a hacker, exploiting those bugs …

Intel’s New 10-Nanometer Chips Have Finally Arrived

Today we learned everything there is to know about the new Intel chip that will likely power the next laptop you buy. For months, the chipmaker has been hyping the launch of its 10th-generation, 10-nanometer silicon processor, codenamed Ice Lake. We heard a little about it at CES in Las Vegas in January and at Computex in Taipei, Taiwan, in May. Now Ice Lake chips are officially available for PC makers to use, so Intel is finally sharing all the critical details. The company has also been teasing Project Athena, a new set of laptop specifications and performance expectations that Intel says it will co-engineer with PC makers. The Athena program is, in many ways, not unlike the Ultrabook specifications …

New missile defense tech destroys incoming nukes faster

If a Space-Based Infrared satellite detected a launch, it would quickly send sensitive data signals to an Air Force command center where the information would be evaluated by computers. Then, the command center would send a wide-sweeping “alert through the ballistic missile defense system,” a senior Pentagon official told Warrior. “When a satellite recognizes something that looks like a launch, it has a mathematical formula in a computer that tracks the heat source,” the official said. “Then we start turning on radar”… he added. Response decisions, which could involve the immediate deployment of a well-armed and ready U.S. nuclear triad…. hinge almost entirely upon .. time. In effect, the faster tracking, targeting and countermeasure analysis can take place, the greater …

Depth of Field: The Otherworldliness of the Democratic Presidential Debates

Reality TV is meant to trick the eyes. The high drama of housewives bickering about who said what over a bottle of wine. Cast members secretly scheming to avoid elimination off the island. Contestants blatantly lying to rig the game in their favor. What unfolds before us, to quote Susan Murray and Laura Ouelette in 2008's Reality TV: Remaking Television Culture, "is an unstable text that encourages viewers to test out their own notions of the real, the ordinary, and the intimate against the representation before them." This week, inside Detroit's Fox Theatre, Democratic presidential hopefuls participated in the second round of debates. Last night found two of the top candidates—Senator Kamala Harris and Vice President Joe Biden, along with …

A Tale of Two Jeffreys: How the Virgin Islands Welcomed a Rich Sex Offenderand Punished a Poor One

From the Virgin Islands comes a tale of two Jeffreys, and the difference great wealth can make when it comes to sex crimesuntil it doesn't. Both Jeffreys were convicted of shameful crimes that required them to register as sex offenders in whatever state or jurisdiction they resided. plea deal only a super-rich guy could have swung. He did 18 months locked up, mostly in a private wing of the Palm Beach County jail, where he only stayed at night, returning each morning to who appeared to be barely in their teens. He would announce his periodic return by raising the American flag over the opulent hideaway identified on the maps as Little Saint James Island, but the headline in a …

Children From The US And Mexico Play Together On These Seesaws Built On The Border Wall In Defiance Of Trump

Like something out of a fairytale, a set of shocking pink seesaws sprang up right in the middle of the United States border wall with Mexico. Quite unsurprisingly, the seesaws became an instant hit. Children (and adults!) flocked to have fun on them, not minding the metal border wall that separated them. Image credits: The seesaws were installed right across the US-Mexico border between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez in Mexico. The geniuses behind this brilliant and playful idea were two professors. They are Ronald Rael, a professor of architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, and Virginia San Fratello — an associate professor of design at San José State University posted videos and photos of the seesaws in …

45 Funny And Strange Things Spotted On the Subway (New Pics)

Ah, the subway! The magical place where the laws of normality stop working. The moment you go underground to catch a train, you’d best be prepared to see hilarious, weird and, frankly, mind-blowing things. To keep you laughing all day long and to remind you that life is full of little surprises, Bored Panda compiled this list of funny, bizarre and peculiar things spotted on the subway. Vote for your favorite strange(r) things (pun most definitely intended), and let us know in the comments below what you think the stories behind the pictures are. Also, be sure to check out Bored Panda’s other lists about the subway, including weird people, the most beautiful metro stations, vintage photos of New York’s …

Using AI and Film to Track Tear Gas Use Against Civilians

Filmmaker Laura Poitras’ Oscar-winning documentary Citizenfour centers on the pale, calm face of National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden holed up in a plain Hong Kong hotel room. Her latest star is even more impassive—an aluminum tear gas grenade—but it's seen amid surreal pulsating color. The 10-minute short, Triple Chaser, is named for that tear gas canister, a branded product of Florida’s Safariland Group that human rights groups say has been used by US border agents against migrants in Tijuana and by Israeli forces in Palestine. The film, a collaboration with the nonprofit Forensic Architecture, documents how that organization is devel­oping machine-learning software that could help uncover where Triple Chaser canisters are being launched or thrown. It also accuses prominent …